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施心远主编第二版第三册《听力教程》unit_3答案

Unit 3

Section One Tactics for listening Part 1 Spot Dictation Wildlife Every ten minutes, one kind of animal, plant or insect (1) dies out for ever. If nothing is done about it, one million species that are alive today will have become (2) extinct twenty years from now. The seas are in danger. They are being filled with (3) poison: industrial and nuclear waste, chemical fertilizers and (4) pesticides, sewage. If nothing is done about it, one day soon nothing will be able to (5) live in the seas. The tropical rain (6) forests which are the home of half the earth's living things are (7) being destroyed. If nothing is done about it, they will have (8) nearly disappeared in twenty years. The effect on the world's (9) climate - and on our agriculture and food (10) supplies - will be disastrous. (11) Fortunately, somebody is trying to do something about it. In 1961, the (12) World Wildlife Fund was founded - a small group of people who wanted to (13) raise money to save animals and plants (14) from extinction. Today, the World Wildlife Fund is a large (15) international organization. It has raised over (16) ? 35 million for (17)

conservation projects, and has created or given support to the National Parks in (18) five continents. It has helped 30 (19) mammals and birds including the tiger - to (20) survive. Part 2 Listening for Gist

Mrs. Bates: Hullo. Is that Reception? . Reception: Yes, madam Mrs. Bates: This is Mrs. Bates. Room 504. I sent some clothes to the laundry this morning, two of my husband's shirts and three of my blouses. But they're not back yet. You see, we're leaving early tomorrow morning. Reception: Just a moment, madam. I'll put you through to the housekeeper. Housekeeper: Hullo. Housekeeper. Mrs. Bates: Oh, hullo. This is ... I'm phoning from Room 504. It's about some clothes I sent to the laundry this morning. They're not back yet and you see ... Housekeeper: They are, madam. You'll find them in your wardrobe. They're in the top drawer on the left. Mrs. Bates: Oh, I didn't look in the wardrobe. Thank you very much. Sorry to trouble you. Housekeeper: That's quite all right. Goodbye. Mrs. Bates: Goodbye.

Exercise Directions: Listen to the dialogue and write down the gist and the key words that help you decide. 1) This dialogue is about making an inquiry about the laundry. 2) The key words are reception. laundry. shirts. blouses. wardrobe.

Section Two Listening Comprehension Part 1 Dialogue

A UN Interpreter Interviewer: ... so perhaps you could tell us how exactly you became so proficient at language learning, Suzanne. Suzanne: Well, I think it all started with a really fortunate accident of birth. You know I was born in Lausanne*, Switzerland; my father was Swiss-French Swiss and my mother was American, so, of course, we spoke both languages at home and I grew up bilingual. Then, of course, I learnt German at school - in Switzerland that's normal. And because I was already fluent in English, my second language at school was Italian. So I had a real head start (有利的开端)! Interviewer: So that's ... one, two, three, four - you had learnt four languages by the time you left school? How fluent were you? Suzanne: Urn, I was native speaker standard in French and English, but

I'd become a bit rusty* in German and my Italian was only school standard. I decided the best option was to study in the UK, and I did Hispanic Studies at university, studying Spanish and Portuguese, with some Italian, and living in Manchester. Then I went to live in Brazil for two years, teaching English. Interviewer: So by this time you must have been fluent in six languages? Suzanne: Nearly. My Italian wasn't perfect, but I had a boyfriend from Uruguay* while I was there, so my Spanish also became pretty good! Interviewer: And then what did you do? Suzanne: When I was 25 I came back to Switzerland, went to an interpreters' school and then got a job in the United Nations when I was 28. Interviewer: And you've been there ever since? Suzanne: Not quite. In the first few months I met Jan, a Czech interpreter, who became my husband. We went to live in Prague in 1987 and that was where I learnt Czech. Interviewer: And the eighth language? Suzanne: Well, unfortunately the marriage didn't last; I was very upset and I decided to take a long break. I went to Japan on holiday, got a job and stayed for two years, which was when I learnt Japanese.

Interviewer: That's amazing! And now you're back at the United Nations? Suzanne: Yes. Well, I never really left. I carried on doing work for them when I was in Prague - some in Prague, some in Austria and Switzerland, and I took a "sabbatical*" to work in Japan. They need people who can understand Japanese. But, yes, I've been back with them full-time for two years now. Interviewer: And your plans for the future? Suzanne: I'm going to learn more Oriental languages. It was such a challenge learning Japanese - it's so different from all the others. So I'll spend another two or three years here with the UN full-time, during which time I hope to get a substantial promotion, then I think I'll go back and learn Korean, or perhaps Chinese, and Thai - I'd love to learn Thai. And then, perhaps an Indian language. Whatever, I want to be fluent in another three or four languages before 45.

Exercise Directions: Listen to the dialogue and decide whether the following statements are true (T) or false (F). l.T 2.F 3.F 4.F 5.T 6.F 7.T 8.T 9. T 10. F

Part 2 Passage

The Clyde River Running through one of Britain's biggest manufacturing centers, Glasgow, the Clyde River* was poisoned for more than a century by the fetid* byproducts of industry. The waterway bore the brunt of (首当其冲)Glasgow's economic success during the Industrial Revolution and beyond, as pollution and chemicals destroyed its fish and wildlife populations and brewed smells whose memory still makes residents wince*. Now, with heavy industry gone and Glasgow reconceived as a center for culture and tourism, the Clyde is coming back to life. For the first time since the late 1800s, its native salmon have returned in sizable numbers, reflecting the new cleanliness of a river that was once one of Britain's filthiest. The Clyde River Foundation surveyed fish populations last autumn at 69 sites in the Clyde and its tributaries, and found salmon in seven of the nine major tributaries. The migratory fish, which vanished from the Clyde around 1880 after a long decline, first reappeared in the 1980s, but last year's survey was the first to show they've come back in healthy numbers. Although commercial salmon fishing was never widespread on the Clyde, the fish's return is symbolically important for Glasgow, where salmon were once so important to the city's identity that two are pictured

on its official coat of arms. The salmon's comeback is also a sign of big improvements to water quality. Like sea trout, which have also reappeared in the Clyde system in recent years, salmon are very sensitive to environmental conditions and require cool, well-oxygenated* water to thrive. The decline of Glasgow's main industries helped boost the fortunes of a river that was essentially fishless for decades during the worst periods of pollution. The closure of factories that had poured toxins* and other pollutants into the river boosted water quality significantly. Environmental regulators also lightened dumping rules, and modern sewage processing plants helped eliminate some of the foul* smells that once tainted* the air. With worries rising about the environmental impact of enormous fish farms elsewhere in Scotland and severely depleted fish stocks in the North Sea and North Atlantic, the Clyde comeback is a rare bit of good news for Scotland's fish lovers. Since the area that is now Glasgow was first settled around the year 550, the Clyde has been central to its history. The river's depth and navigability helped make Glasgow an important center for importing tobacco, sugar and cotton from the Americas starting in the 1600s. Later, during the Industrial Revolution that began in the late

1700s, Glasgow became a center of British shipbuilding and one of the country's great manufacturing centers. The mills and factories that lined the Clyde made steel, textiles and chemicals, tanned leather and even produced candy and brewed alcohol. When the factories began to close in the second half of the 20th century, working-class Glasgow, Scotland's largest city, gained a reputation for social deprivation and rough streets. More recently, its art museums and nightlife have helped drive an economic comeback that has turned the city into a popular tourist destination.

Exercise A Pre-listening Question Rivers are important to humans because they supply fresh drinking water, serve as home for important fishes, and provide transportation routes.

Exercise B Sentence Dictation Directions: Listen to some sentences and write them down. You will hear each sentence three times. 1) Salmon are very sensitive to environmental conditions and require cool, well-oxygenated water to thrive. 2) The closure of factories that had poured toxins and other pollutants into the river boosted water quality significantly and modern sewage processing plants (污水处理厂) helped eliminate some of the foul

smells. 3) The river's depth and navigability helped make Glasgow an important center for importing tobacco, sugar and cotton from the Americas starting in the 1600s. 4) The mills and factories that lined the Clyde made steel, textiles and chemicals, tanned leather and even produced candy and brewed alcohol. 5) When the factories began to close in the second half of the 20th century, working-class Glasgow, Scotland's largest city, gained a reputation for social deprivation(社会剥夺)and rough streets.

Exercise C Detailed Listening Directions: Listen to the passage and choose the best answer to complete each of the following sentences. l.A 2. C 3. C 4. B 5. D 6. C 7. B 8. A

Exercise D After-listening Discussion Directions: Listen to the passage again and discuss the following questions. 1) The Clyde's depth and navigability helped make Glasgow an important center for importing tobacco, sugar and cotton from the Americas starting in the 1600s. And the city became a center of British

shipbuilding and one of the country's great manufacturing centers during the Industrial Revolution. More recently, its art museums and nightlife have helped drive an economic comeback that has turned the city into a popular tourist destination. 2) (Open)

Section Three :News

News Item 1 Governments Ban Nine Of The World's Most Hazardous Chemicals UN Environment Program Executive Director Achim Steiner calls the agreement historic. He says the nine chemicals that have joined the list of Persistent Organic Pollutants, or POPS, are extremely harmful to the environment and to health. The newly targeted chemicals include products that are widely used in pesticides and flame-retardants, and in a number of other commercial uses, such as a treatment for head lice. These nine toxic chemicals will join the Stockholm Convention's original list of 12 Persistent Organic Pollutants, referred to as the "dirty dozen." The pollutants are especially dangerous because they cross boundaries and travel long distances, from the Equator to the Arctic. They persist in

the atmosphere and take many years, often decades, to degrade into less dangerous forms. They pose great risks to the environment and human health, especially to young people, farmers, pregnant women and the unborn.
A esicrexE

Directions: Listen to the news item and complete the summary. This news item is about a ban of nine of the world’s most hazardous chemicals.

B esicrexE

Directions: Listen to the news again and complete the following passage. UN environment Program Executive welcomed the agreement to ban the production of nine of the world’s most hazardous chemicals that are extremely harmful to the environment and to health. These substances will join a list of 12 other so-called persistent organic pollutants, or POPS, that are prohibited under an international treaty known as the Stockholm Convention. The newly targeted chemicals include products that are widely used in pesticides and flame-retardants, and in a number of other commercial uses, such as a treatment for head lice. The pollutants are especially dangerous because they cross

boundaries and travel long distances, from the Equator to the Arctic. They persist in the atmosphere and take many years, often decades, to degrade into less dangerous forms. They pose great risks to the environment and human health, especially to young people, farmers, pregnant women and the unborn.

News Item2 World Climate Conference to Focus on Adaptation to Climate Change Scientists predict the world will get hotter over the coming decades. A major conference in Copenhagen at the end of the year will focus on ways to mitigate the worst affects of global warming. WMO Secretary-General Michel Jarraud (世界气象组织秘书长贾 侯)says countries must have the tools to adapt to a changing climate. They must be able to respond to a world that is likely to experience more extreme weather events, such as floods and hurricanes. Jarraud notes farmers in certain parts of the world will have to adapt to a dryer climate. He says they might have to modify irrigation systems or consider growing crops that do not require much rain. He says global warming is likely to increase the intensity and frequency of extreme weather events. Therefore, better and more timely information on these phenomena are essential to make decisions on

climate variability and change. To do this, he says, weather observation networks must be strengthened. The WMO chief says climate change is a global problem. And, everyone needs everyone else to solve this problem. He says even the biggest, richest countries cannot do it alone. He says the developed world needs reliable weather information from developing countries and vice-versa.

Exercise A Directions: Listen to the news item and complete the summary. This news item is about an appeal for global cooperation to deal with climate change. Exercise B Directions: Listen to the news again and answer the following questions. 1) Scientists predict the world will get hotter over the coming decades. 2)A major conference in Copenhagen at the end of the year will focus on ways to mitigate the worst affects of global warming. 3) Countries must have the tools to adapt to a changing climate. 4) Jarraud notes farmers in certain parts of the world will have to adapt to a dryer climate. He says they might have to modify irrigation

systems or consider growing crops that do not require much rain.

5) Global warming is likely to increase the intensity and frequency of extreme weather events. 6) Weather observation networks must be strengthened. 7) Even the biggest, richest countries cannot do it alone. He says the developed world needs reliable weather information from developing countries and vice-versa.

News Item3 Scientists have warned that the Great Barrier Reef - which stretches for more than 2,500 kilometers down Australia's northeast coast - is likely to bear the brunt of warmer ocean temperatures. A major concern has been the bleaching of coral, where the sensitive marine organisms wither under environmental stress caused by increased water temperature, pollution or sedimentation. An unexpected discovery at the southern end of the reef has provided some rare good news for researchers. Researchers found that coral in the Keppel Islands off Queensland, which was damaged by bleaching in 2006 and then smothered by seaweed that overgrew the reef, has managed to repair itself. Experts say to see reefs bounce back from mass coral bleaching in less than a decade is highly unusual. Like other coral systems, the Great Barrier Reef is facing a range of

environmental threats. Scientists say their capacity to recovery from damage inflicted by warmer waters, for example, will be critical to its future health. The Great Barrier Reef is one of Australia's premier tourist attractions. It covers an area bigger than Britain and is the largest living structure on earth and the only one visible from space.

Exercise A Directions: Listen to the news item and complete the summary. This news item is about the Great Barrier Reef.

Exercise B Directions: Listen to the news again and decide whether the following statements are true (T) or false (F). l. T 2. F 3. T 4.F 5. T 6. T

Section Four Supplementary Exercises Part 1Feature Report Sydney Ready for Big Switch Off as Earth Hour Goes Global Scotland's Edinburgh Castle, the Bird's Nest stadium in Beijing and the pyramids in Egypt will join the Sydney Opera House in dimming their lights as part of Earth Hour.

The global event has been endorsed by the Secretary-General of the United Nations. Ban Ki-moon has said it was the biggest climate change demonstration ever attempted. Mr. Ban urged people everywhere to pressure their governments to take decisive action to cut carbon pollution. Organizers are hoping that up to a billion people from small villages in Namibia to sprawling cities in Asia will participate in an international effort to cut greenhouse gas emissions, which many scientists blame for a warming climate. One of the architects of Earth Hour, Andy Ridley from the conservation group World Wildlife Fund (WWF), says the current financial meltdown should not be used as an excuse to delay environmental reforms. "The global economic crisis has proved that we are a global community, so when America goes bad, we all go bad and climate change is going to be on a scale that is way, way beyond our global economic crisis at the moment and we need to put in place the measures to a) slow that down and ideally halt it, b) be ready for economies that will have to change. So, the longer we procrastinate the more we pay the penalty so we need to move quickly," he said. Earth Hour was started by environmentalists in Sydney in 2007. It encourages households, businesses and governments to switch off all non-essential lights for 60 minutes in a show of unified concern for the

health and future of the planet. In two years, the event has become a large global movement and its aim is to create an enormous wave of public pressure that will influence delegates at a meeting in Copenhagen later this year, which hopes to establish a new U.N. climate treaty. However, critics of Earth Hour have insisted it is simply a symbolic gesture that will not affect significant environmental change. The event will officially begin on the international dateline in the remote Chatham Islands southeast of New Zealand and will conclude in Hawaii. Exercise A: Directions: Listen to the news report and complete the summary. This news report is about a global event known as Earth Hour. Exercise B Directions: Listen to the news again and complete the following sentences. 1. Scotland's Edinburgh Castle, the Bird's Nest stadium in Beijing and the pyramids in Egypt will join the Sydney Opera House in dimming their lights as part of Earth Hour. 2. Ban Ki-moon has said it was the biggest climate change demonstration ever attempted. 3. Organizers are hoping that up to a billion people will participate in an

international effort to cut greenhouse gas emissions, which many scientists blame for a warming climate. 4. Andy Ridley, One of the architects of Earth Hour, says the current financial meltdown should not be used as an excuse to delay environmental reforms. 5. In two years, the event has become a large global movement and its aim is to create an enormous wave of public pressure that will influence delegates at a meeting in Copenhagen later this year.

Part 2 Passage Lab produces shape-shifting fruits and vegetables Many fruits and vegetables we know almost as much by their shape as by their color or taste. Bananas are long and curved. Onions are round. But what if you could alter the familiar shape? Would a square tomato still be a tomato? Scientists are learning how to change the shape of fruits and vegetables so they can be harvested or processed more efficiently, or maybe just to reduce waste in the kitchen. It can be done to some extent with traditional hybrid techniques. And as we hear from reporter Julie Grant, it can also be done by flipping a genetic switch. Ester van der Knaap steps gingerly around the greenhouse. We're at the Ohio State Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster.

Van Der Knaap points out short, round tomatoes - and some odd-looking long, thin ones. VAN DER KNAAP: "That's one gene. One gene can make that difference." Van der Knaap's team discovered that gene and isolated it. They call it the SUN gene. And they've been able to clone it in tomatoes. Van der Knaap's research could lead to square-shapes - something she thinks the tomato industry might like. Square tomatoes fit into packages better. And, overall, square tomatoes might be easier to work with than the common round tomatoes. So far money for her research has come from the National Science Foundation - not big ag. Designer fruit shapes are gaining popularity. People have been cross-breeding tomatoes to make the shapes they want for a long time. But this is not the same thing. Dick Alford is a chef and professor of hospitality management at the University of Akron [Ohio]. The difference between what his brother and lots of other folks have been doing and what van der Knaap is doing is the difference between cross-breeding and locating a specific gene that affects the shape of tomatoes. Chef Alford watches students as they cut yellow crookneck squash

and carrots. They're trying to make uniform, symmetrical shapes out of curvy and pointed vegetables. There's a lot of waste. Chef Alford hates to see so much get thrown away. So he's got a request of Dr. van der Knaap. ALFORD: "If we could get square carrots, it would be great. If you could get a tomato as long as a cucumber, where you could get 20 or 30 slices out of them, it would be great." In a country that loves hamburgers, Van der Knaap has heard that request before. But the long, thin tomato hasn't worked out just yet. She says there's more genetics to be studied. “Once we know all the genes responsible for making different shapes in tomatoes”, Van der Knaap says, “ we'll have a better idea of what controls the shape of other crops, such peppers, cucumbers and gourds. And maybe then we'll get those square carrots.”

Exercise A Pre-listening Question (open)

Exercise B Sentence Dictation Directions: Listen to some sentences and write them down. You will hear each sentence three times. 1. what if you could alter the familiar shape? Would a square tomato still

be a tomato? 2. Scientists are learning how to change the shape of fruits and vegetables so they can be harvested or processed more efficiently, or maybe just to reduce waste in the kitchen. 3. People have been cross-breeding tomatoes to make the shapes they want for a long time. But this is not the same thing. 4. If you could get a tomato as long as a cucumber, where you could get 20 or 30 slices out of it, it would be great. 5. Once we know all the genes responsible for making different shapes in tomatoes, we'll have a better idea of what controls the shape of other crops, such as peppers, cucumbers and gourds. Exercise C Detailed Listening Directions: Listen to the passage and answer the following questions. 1. Bananas and Onions are the examples known as much by their shape as by their color or taste. 2. The hybrid or cross-breeding technique is regarded as the traditional way of changing the shape of fruits. 3. The genetic technique which can also change the shape of fruits. 4. They discovered the SUN gene and managed to clone it in tomatoes. 5. Compared with round tomatoes, square tomatoes might be easier to work with than the common round tomatoes. 6. The difference between what his brother and lots of other folks have

been doing and what van der Knaap is doing is the difference between cross-breeding and locating a specific gene that affects the shape of tomatoes. 7. There's a lot of waste. Chef Alford hates to see so much get thrown away. So he's got a request of Dr. van der Knaap. 8. “Once we know all the genes responsible for making different shapes in tomatoes, Van der Knaap says we'll have a better idea of what controls the shape of other crops, such peppers, cucumbers and gourds. And maybe then we'll get those square carrots.” Exercise D After-listening Discussion Directions: Listen to the passage again and discuss the following questions. 1. Chef Alford’s request: "If we could get square carrots, it would be great. If you could get a nice long, a tomato as long as a cucumber, where you could get 20 or 30 slices out of them, it would be great." Van der Knaap’s opinion is that the long, thin tomato hasn't worked out just yet. and there's more genetics to be studied. 2) (Open)


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